Textbook Scavenger Hunt

slide1I put this together recently for my literacy class. I’m posting here mainly because I there’s quite a variety of questions that can be asked in a textbook scavenger hunt. I think I did a pretty good job of covering a wide range of potential questions and having them available in the future should speed up the process. The textbook I used is one of the books required for my literacy class, so it’s not exactly representative of a book you might use in a high-school classroom, but the principals are the same

Textbook Scavenger Hunt, using “The Right to Literacy in Secondary Schools: Creating a Culture of Thinking” Edited by Suzanne Plaut.
Name________________________
Date _________________________

Instructions: Work together with your group to see if you can be the first to complete this textbook scavenger hunt. Raise your hand when you are done

Q#1: What page does the index start on?

Q#2: Can you find the date of publication?

Q#3: How many times is Ray Bradbury mentioned in the book?

Q#4: Find out what in the world a  “box and whisker plot” is and describe it in a sentence.  

Q#5: Find the chapter most likely to contain information specifically useful for Language Arts teachers

Q#6: Find the chapter most likely to contain information specifically useful for Math teachers

Q#7: Find the longest chapter in the book using the table of contents.

Q#8: Skim chapter 2 to find out what metacognitive strategies successful readers use, according to Roehler, Dole and Duffy. (hint: use the section headings and pay special attention to the first sentence of each paragraph.)

Q#9: In chapter 6, Quinlan and Cazier compare education to lighting a fire. Skim the chapter to find out what they are talking about when they use the metaphor of “oxygen” and “fuel” in education. (hint: use the section headings and pay special attention to the first sentence of each paragraph.)

Q#10: Find this book’s ISBN number.

 

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